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Wednesday, September 11, 2013

What's the Difference Between Being Overweight and Obese?

The words "overweight" and "obese" are often used simultaneously. Both seem to mean the same, that a person is carrying more pounds than they should, but is there a difference? Is one worse than the other? The answer is yes, on both questions.

Overweight - is defined by doctors as occurring when a person's weight is 10-20 percent over a healthy normal weight. Normal and healthy is determined by what is known as body mass index (BMI), or as height vs. weight. Basically, doctors have determined that 25-30 percent of your body weight can be fat and anything above that is unhealthy.

Obese - when a person's weight rises to 20 percent or more above a recommended healthy weight for their height and body build, or a BMI of 30 or more, that person is considered obese.

Morbidly obese - this third level describes people who are 50-100 percent over their normal weight. Morbidly obese can also refer to anyone who is 100 pounds overweight or whose overweight condition is causing problems with normal body functions.

So, how many Americans are obese? Nearly a third of all adults, or 60 million Americans. There are a number of ways to measure whether you are overweight or obese, such as simple height/weight charts, and calipers used in weight loss clinics or health clubs that "pinch an inch" on various parts of the body to determine how much of the tissue is fat.

The important point is to recognize when it's time to do something about it. Being overweight can quickly progress to being obese and eventually lead to serious health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and more. Don't wait. Manage your weight and your health now.
DISCLAIMER: The content or opinions expressed on this web site are not to be interpreted as medical advice. Please consult with your doctor or medical practictioner before utilizing any suggestions on this web site.
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